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Height Weight Chart

Is the latest height weight chart
accurate for seniors?

A height weight chart, like so many guidelines, tells only part of the story. As a result, a height weight chart can be especially deceptive for seniors.

According to the latest height weight chart, 6 of 10 of adults are overweight — the Surgeon General calls it epidemic. But, The Wall Street Journal says the height weight chart used to reach that conclusion is based on "... a survey even the CDC says is too small." And, the body-mass-index height weight chart doesn't distinguish between muscle and fat. As a result, several well-known muscular Hollywood stars and top-performing athletes are incorrectly considered to be over weight for their height — even obese — (see celebrity height weight chart).

A standard height weight chart may be too restrictive for seniors. According to the Archives of Internal Medicine, being mildly over weight is not a significant risk factor for death in most older adults. While more research must be done, the following height weight chart may be more suitable for men and women age 65 and older.

Height Weight Chart for Seniors (revised)

Height
feet / inches
Weight
in Pounds
4' 8" 84 - 124
4' 9" 87 - 129
4' 10" 90 - 133
4' 11" 93 - 138
5' 0" 96 - 143
5' 1" 99 - 147
5' 2" 102 - 152
5' 3" 106 - 157
5' 4" 109 - 162
5' 5" 113 - 167
5' 6" 116 - 172
5' 6" 120 - 178
5' 8" 123 - 183
5' 9" 127 - 188
5' 10" 130 - 194
5' 11" 134 - 200
6' 0" 138 - 205
6' 1" 142 - 211
6' 2" 146 - 216
6' 3" 150 - 222
6' 4" 154 - 229
6' 5" 158 - 235
6' 6" 162 - 241
6' 7" 166 - 247
6' 8" 170 - 254

  

Note: This chart applies to the general population of American adults. It may not be appropriate for you. Check with your doctor.

Source: This chart was based on the article, "An Evidenced-Based Assessment of Federal Guidelines for Overweight and Obesity as They Apply to Older Persons," Asefeh Heiat, MD, et al, Archives of Internal Medicine, Vol 161, May 14, 2001.

Recent studies show it's much better to be slightly overweight and healthy through exercise, than it is to be an "ideal" weight but sedentary. The healthiest option is to be fit and trim, and eat a healthy diet.

Moderate exercise for 30 minutes 5 days a week substantially reduces the danger of being overweight, even if it doesn't take off pounds. And, it doesn't have to be done all at once. For example, you could exercise in 10-minute sessions, 3 times a day.

It is important to be consistent. Set time aside to exercise for the rest of your life. But don't be obsessive about it; if you miss a day occasionally, don't feel guilty about it.

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